Barricade Permit

Per city ordinance Section 36.09.131, a Barricade Permit must be obtained from Traffic Engineering before any work takes place within the public right of way. This permitting process reduces risk to the traveling public and workers by requiring a valid traffic control plan and field inspections of traffic control devices.

To receive a permit, submit the Barricade Permit Form (link below) including a traffic control plan to Traffic Engineering along with a $30 fee. This fee covers Traffic Engineering's review of the permit application and traffic control plan, as well as field inspections of the deployed traffic control.

Traffic control must comply with all specifications set forth in the 2011 Texas Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices R2 (TMUTCD).

Properly implemented temporary traffic control reduces risk of accidents and injuries to workers and the traveling public. Well-designed work zones and detours reduce driver frustration and inconvenience. State regulations require that the needs and control of all road users including pedestrians and persons with disabilities be considered in highway construction, utility work, maintenance operations, and the management of traffic incidents. Work zones cannot be left unattended for extended periods of time. When practical, take down work zones when work is not taking place.

Part 6 of the 2011 Texas Manual on Uniform Traffic Control (TMUTCD) offers a comprehensive guide to designing and implementing safe and effective work zones. The following excerpts provide guidance but should not be relied on solely for designing and implementing all work zones.

The following components are necessary for safe and effective work zones:

  • Advance Warning Area: Provides road users with a general message that work is taking place and action is required. Further messages about what to expect and what actions are required follow.
  • Transition Area: Moves traffic safely out of the path of the work area. Under typical conditions, transitions should move traffic smoothly without sudden changes in speed or direction. Traffic must encounter traffic control devices before any equipment, personnel or fixed objects.
  • Buffer Space: Provides additional protection to traffic and workers by offering unoccupied space for unplanned maneuvers.
  • Work Space: Activity area where all work takes place. A properly designed work zone gives workers enough space to safely perform the job.

Traffic Control Example


Required Lengths and Spacing of Traffic Control Devices in Feet (2011 TMUTCD)

Posted Speed (MPH)

Sign Spacing

Recommended Buffer Space

Merging Taper Length (12’ Lane)

Maximum Device Spacing on Taper

Maximum Device Spacing on Tangent

25

100

60

125

25

50

30

120

90

180

30

60

35

160

120

245

35

70

40

240

155

320

40

80

45

320

195

540

45

90

50

400

240

600

50

100

55

500

295

660

55

110

60

600

350

720

60

120

65

700

410

780

65

130

70

800

475

840

70

140


Typically, broken lane lines are 10 feet in length with a space of 30 feet between them. They are excellent guides for placing traffic control devices. For example, a 160-foot sign spacing is 4 broken lane lines.